Jump to content

STRIKERxWICKED

Mods On Console?

Recommended Posts

15 hours ago, Mooseviking11b said:

so i got a question, not trying to troll or sound stupid here. bear with me as im doped up a little on pain meds after getting out of the hospital this morning. however, i know back in the earlier days of skyrim and for oblivion, people have found ways to extract their game files, and save files off of their xbox to the PC and then in turn through some very good computer skills added the mod files to the games files then re loaded them back into their xbone/360. has anyone known anyone to have tried this method? again not trying to sound stupid, its been a while since ive been into dabbling into computer stuff on any level close to that. i can re run an entire network system in a car or truck, but its been a while since i dabbled in personal computer stuff so im nto too up to par with a lot of the new tech, o.s etc.

If you are going to go through all that trouble you might as well just download the steam version and download mods legit. Im pretty sure you can use a controller too. 

As a side note that sounds like a good way to get your xbox locked out of xbox live forever if you care.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎8‎/‎15‎/‎2018 at 6:01 AM, F1nchyStryd3r said:

Got an Xbox one X, running around 104 mods on Skyrim and around 60 on Fallout 4 (no problem, no bugs), I can't see WC allowing mods on console as it'd take them well into the next century to figure out how to do it. Taken them ages to fix regular bugs in this game already. Bethesda has the money and expertise to run and maintain mods, WC doesn't.

How did you make the Xbox one X running 104 mods?,  because I am not able to do it

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/7/2019 at 6:37 AM, BigblackbountyhuntaD said:

Are we ever going to get the rest of s+ on console bc it was april 2018 when we got the first installment console really needs mods

We didn’t get S+. We got the integrated version. Console needs console players to design and create the mods with the backing of their platforms. So far only Bethesda and Paradox Interactive allow mods on console. You expect an indy company to invest in console mods when there are triple A companies out there with the money who haven’t yet made the jump. Businesses need to keep their investors happy if they want to continue.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
21 hours ago, SaltyMonkey said:

We didn’t get S+. We got the integrated version. Console needs console players to design and create the mods with the backing of their platforms. So far only Bethesda and Paradox Interactive allow mods on console. You expect an indy company to invest in console mods when there are triple A companies out there with the money who haven’t yet made the jump. Businesses need to keep their investors happy if they want to continue.

I agree with this 100 percent. The chances of mods of any sort coming to console is next to nothing, especially considering the fact that the current gen consoles outside of the Xbox One X and PS4 Pro already struggle to run the base game. Even if it did come, it would likely be very limited due to hardware limitations, and even more so with the lack of effort that Wildcard puts towards the console versions of their game.
I would give the advice to not listen to greedy clickbait youtubers like LoadedCrysis and Neroku; they're just speaking out of their asses and are only doing their videos for the views because views = money. You also have to consider that Microsoft and Sony have extremely strict policies when it comes to modifying or transferring game files, which is why you cannot access the internal files of a console without J-tagging it (jailbreaking), softmodding via installing a custom BIOS, or mod-chipping it (which currently, to my knowledge cannot be done with current gen consoles) and that file transfer is out of the question because you would have to be an expert in cracking consoles to be able to do anything to get past the overkill security that Microsoft and Sony use to limit the freedom of all console users.

On 1/26/2019 at 9:31 AM, TedyBearOfDeath said:

If you are going to go through all that trouble you might as well just download the steam version and download mods legit. Im pretty sure you can use a controller too. 

As a side note that sounds like a good way to get your xbox locked out of xbox live forever if you care.

You can use a controller on the Steam version of the game, but with the inventory management on ARK being a living hell while using a controller, if you actually play the Steam version of the game, you might as well use your keyboard and mouse.
About the bottom line, yes, as I mentioned before, file-transferring is actually against the CoC, I actually did get one of my consoles permanently banned from Xbox Live just by making save file backups for a game I used to play. This was back on the Xbox 360 when it was VERY easy to jailbreak a console and where hacking/modding ran rampant, But I soft-modded my console solely for the purpose of backing up files and got banned in less than 24 hours for it, which Xbox DESPERATELY needs to ensure it's longevity and help games that do frequently corrupt your saves like ARK, I've lost many save files on many different games due to file corruptions (including ARK and all my dedicated server saves) that are caused solely by the fact that the cloud fragments your data when playing across multiple accounts, which would help explain why my alt account I used to use on ARK would never save my explorer notes or map progression.
As @TedyBearOfDeath mentioned, with that you might as well get the Steam version of the game. What's even more hilarious is it's actually CHEAPER, 50 USD for the Steam version vs. 60 USD on console, (minor difference, but still a difference) and you get far more for what you pay due to mods, and, being Steam, you don't have to pay an expensive subscription just to be able to play online, something that steered me away from consoles a long time ago and is something that also needs to change. 
Apologies for sounding like a PC elitist. I just thought this was worth pointing out. Hope my advice helps.

Edited by Level4Gaming

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/8/2019 at 7:33 AM, SaltyMonkey said:

We didn’t get S+. We got the integrated version. Console needs console players to design and create the mods with the backing of their platforms. So far only Bethesda and Paradox Interactive allow mods on console. You expect an indy company to invest in console mods when there are triple A companies out there with the money who haven’t yet made the jump. Businesses need to keep their investors happy if they want to continue.

True but xbox does need the rest of s+ and it doesnt even need to be a mod like for example change the demolish code to pick up so you dont just have 30 seconds try their best to have the pull button like s+ it may take a while but i would rather wait couple months to a yr then never play it again i am a big xbox gamer and i love playing ark but i hate it bc its so glitchy and you need mods to be able to have fun i cant play it on pc without mods all im saying is that if they actually cared about there console based fans they could have delayed extinction or even scorched when it was released all im saying is that we need mods but to take us away from the topic they just hit us with dlcs but if they had fixed the original game and gave us what we wanted (to the best of their capabilities) this wouldnt be a page asking for mods it would be how to use them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, BigblackbountyhuntaD said:

True but xbox does need the rest of s+ and it doesnt even need to be a mod like for example change the demolish code to pick up so you dont just have 30 seconds try their best to have the pull button like s+ it may take a while but i would rather wait couple months to a yr then never play it again i am a big xbox gamer and i love playing ark but i hate it bc its so glitchy and you need mods to be able to have fun i cant play it on pc without mods all im saying is that if they actually cared about there console based fans they could have delayed extinction or even scorched when it was released all im saying is that we need mods but to take us away from the topic they just hit us with dlcs but if they had fixed the original game and gave us what we wanted (to the best of their capabilities) this wouldnt be a page asking for mods it would be how to use them

It’s not down to Wildcard to give console players mods. Wildcard aren’t the ones creating them. You expect people to create a mod on PC and for it to be pushed to console by Wildcard with both Microsoft and Sony being perfectly fine with that decision? This is not a Wildcard issue, it’s a platform issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hey I was wondering will there ever be any mods for Xbox for an example like pyria and Archaic or anything else that pc has I would love if you can respond to me because I love ark it’s one of my favorite games and I would love to have pc mods on Xbox 

Edited by Shrimpybones
Mistake of words

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Shrimpybones said:

Hey I was wondering will there ever be any mods for Xbox for an example like pyria and Archaic or anything else that pc has I would love if you can respond to me because I love ark it’s one of my favorite games and I would love to have pc mods on Xbox 

The only “mods” that could potentially come to console on Ark are the ones integrated into the base game so they lose that title.

The mod contest and sponsored mods isn’t a guaranteed way for mods to become official but the only way we would ever see them integrated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, DemonicScribe said:

Would be nice to have, but Wildcard A.K.A SDE or Snail Games USA is kinda " dimwitted " when it comes to console stuff. They could at least try to add a " mod " option like Bethesda did for Fallout 4.

They also added it for Skyrim. I agree though, we console players should be able to have access to mods too. I assume we can't because consoles such as Xbox One struggle with Ark. Mine can hardly handle Extinction (sometimes not at all), so imagine what mods would do to Ark's playability on console. Unfortunately console players are the Forgotten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Consoles are not forgotten, but there is a lot more to it than just flipping a switch.

I understand the desire to want mods on console platforms, I really do. I'm going to talk about some of the hurdles. This is just general information for you to think about, not just for when vying for console mods for ARK, but any game. These are hurdles that every developer that wants to put mods on consoles will have to come up with an answer for and for some studios they just aren't worth the perpetual cost.

platform requirements: Publishing anything on a console comes with following strict rules about content control and reliability. Certification is that thing that often results in a delay in updates for consoles. It's where they check to make sure that every game and every update to every game follow the rules and requirements. This would be a hurdle for mods because mods will still have to follow all the same rules. For some consoles, certain kinds of mods themselves would be in direct violation. At least one console doesn't allow 3rd party scripting/code to run in the game (Which actually is a problem for ARK mods since to at least some degree all of them are code based). Additional to that, every mod would have to be certified by someone, and every update to every mod published on the console. With over 5,000 mods on the steam workshop I think you can begin to see where that could get out of hand without a lot of human-power supporting it every day.

Distribution: Consoles do not have support for mod distribution, they do the game distribution and any DLC and that's it. A studio would have to add their own distribution method into the game for storing, finding and downloading mods. Certainly possible, but far from trivial.

Development: No not for us, but for mod authors. This would primarily affect code based mods, but getting your hands on a devkit for every console in order to be able to properly debug any issues that might only be occurring on console would be next to impossible currently. Getting a devkit console for XB1 is pretty easy (Microsoft opened up a path for any XB1 to be turned into a devkit), but the resource access necessary for debugging on it isn't as simple, and I don't think mod authors would be able to get devkits for ps4 & switch at all. Nintendo and Sony are a lot more protective of their devkits.

Modder interest: I think there is sort of this weird assumption that all mod authors would want to publish their mods on consoles. They aren't being paid for it, and it quickly becomes a lot of extra tedious work to publish on multiple platforms that I think only a smaller subset of authors would even be interested in trying to manage.

There is also a trade-off that most people don't consider:
When you buy a console, you are also getting a reasonable expectation that any games you buy for it will run on it, and also that they aren't going to do anything sketchy, I think that is half of the entire reason for why consoles became so popular in the first place.
Now I'm going to be the last one to claim that modders go to the dark side, historically they've proven themselves largely to act responsibly, but there have been some bad apples.
The problem here is that opening consoles up to mods, regardless of their historical record, compromises that expectation. Additionally, anyone using mods whether it be on PC or on consoles absolutely should be aware that there is always some degree of risk associated with using them and neither the console manufacturers or the studios are going to let them selves be held responsible for if something bad does happen.

There's more, but this is already getting lengthy as it is.
Again though this isn't to say mods shouldn't become more prevalent on consoles, but these are some of the larger hurdles. Consoles have slowly started to become more friendly to the idea of mods, but they are still far from actually being "mod-friendly".

You aren't forgotten, not by a long shot, but consoles are a whole different ecosystem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, ZenRowe said:

Consoles are not forgotten, but there is a lot more to it than just flipping a switch.

I understand the desire to want mods on console platforms, I really do. I'm going to talk about some of the hurdles. This is just general information for you to think about, not just for when vying for console mods for ARK, but any game. These are hurdles that every developer that wants to put mods on consoles will have to come up with an answer for and for some studios they just aren't worth the perpetual cost.

platform requirements: Publishing anything on a console comes with following strict rules about content control and reliability. Certification is that thing that often results in a delay in updates for consoles. It's where they check to make sure that every game and every update to every game follow the rules and requirements. This would be a hurdle for mods because mods will still have to follow all the same rules. For some consoles, certain kinds of mods themselves would be in direct violation. At least one console doesn't allow 3rd party scripting/code to run in the game (Which actually is a problem for ARK mods since to at least some degree all of them are code based). Additional to that, every mod would have to be certified by someone, and every update to every mod published on the console. With over 5,000 mods on the steam workshop I think you can begin to see where that could get out of hand without a lot of human-power supporting it every day.

Distribution: Consoles do not have support for mod distribution, they do the game distribution and any DLC and that's it. A studio would have to add their own distribution method into the game for storing, finding and downloading mods. Certainly possible, but far from trivial.

Development: No not for us, but for mod authors. This would primarily affect code based mods, but getting your hands on a devkit for every console in order to be able to properly debug any issues that might only be occurring on console would be next to impossible currently. Getting a devkit console for XB1 is pretty easy (Microsoft opened up a path for any XB1 to be turned into a devkit), but the resource access necessary for debugging on it isn't as simple, and I don't think mod authors would be able to get devkits for ps4 & switch at all. Nintendo and Sony are a lot more protective of their devkits.

Modder interest: I think there is sort of this weird assumption that all mod authors would want to publish their mods on consoles. They aren't being paid for it, and it quickly becomes a lot of extra tedious work to publish on multiple platforms that I think only a smaller subset of authors would even be interested in trying to manage.

There is also a trade-off that most people don't consider:
When you buy a console, you are also getting a reasonable expectation that any games you buy for it will run on it, and also that they aren't going to do anything sketchy, I think that is half of the entire reason for why consoles became so popular in the first place.
Now I'm going to be the last one to claim that modders go to the dark side, historically they've proven themselves largely to act responsibly, but there have been some bad apples.
The problem here is that opening consoles up to mods, regardless of their historical record, compromises that expectation. Additionally, anyone using mods whether it be on PC or on consoles absolutely should be aware that there is always some degree of risk associated with using them and neither the console manufacturers or the studios are going to let them selves be held responsible for if something bad does happen.

There's more, but this is already getting lengthy as it is.
Again though this isn't to say mods shouldn't become more prevalent on consoles, but these are some of the larger hurdles. Consoles have slowly started to become more friendly to the idea of mods, but they are still far from actually being "mod-friendly".

You aren't forgotten, not by a long shot, but consoles are a whole different ecosystem.

Interesting stuff.  Nintendo for one zealously and rigorously controls and guards what comes to their consoles, I am still amazed ARK even was ported over.  But a good read, very informational and a more in-depth look at the issues with console mods.

But let me ask this:  Would the manufacturers even allow you guys to set up a distribution hub on the various platforms easily, or is that a complicated thing for you guys to do?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, TheDonn said:

But let me ask this:  Would the manufacturers even allow you guys to set up a distribution hub on the various platforms easily, or is that a complicated thing for you guys to do?

It's a good question. In practice I've never gone far enough down this particular part of the rabbit hole to be able to find out if they have specific rules for such a thing. I know it's possible, but to my knowledge the console manufacturers provide no support for this, and setting up a distribution system like that even on PC isn't a trivial thing to do. I imagine consoles will also have extra rules regarding security and transfer methods as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, ZenRowe said:

Consoles are not forgotten, but there is a lot more to it than just flipping a switch.

I understand the desire to want mods on console platforms, I really do. I'm going to talk about some of the hurdles. This is just general information for you to think about, not just for when vying for console mods for ARK, but any game. These are hurdles that every developer that wants to put mods on consoles will have to come up with an answer for and for some studios they just aren't worth the perpetual cost.

platform requirements: Publishing anything on a console comes with following strict rules about content control and reliability. Certification is that thing that often results in a delay in updates for consoles. It's where they check to make sure that every game and every update to every game follow the rules and requirements. This would be a hurdle for mods because mods will still have to follow all the same rules. For some consoles, certain kinds of mods themselves would be in direct violation. At least one console doesn't allow 3rd party scripting/code to run in the game (Which actually is a problem for ARK mods since to at least some degree all of them are code based). Additional to that, every mod would have to be certified by someone, and every update to every mod published on the console. With over 5,000 mods on the steam workshop I think you can begin to see where that could get out of hand without a lot of human-power supporting it every day.

Distribution: Consoles do not have support for mod distribution, they do the game distribution and any DLC and that's it. A studio would have to add their own distribution method into the game for storing, finding and downloading mods. Certainly possible, but far from trivial.

Development: No not for us, but for mod authors. This would primarily affect code based mods, but getting your hands on a devkit for every console in order to be able to properly debug any issues that might only be occurring on console would be next to impossible currently. Getting a devkit console for XB1 is pretty easy (Microsoft opened up a path for any XB1 to be turned into a devkit), but the resource access necessary for debugging on it isn't as simple, and I don't think mod authors would be able to get devkits for ps4 & switch at all. Nintendo and Sony are a lot more protective of their devkits.

Modder interest: I think there is sort of this weird assumption that all mod authors would want to publish their mods on consoles. They aren't being paid for it, and it quickly becomes a lot of extra tedious work to publish on multiple platforms that I think only a smaller subset of authors would even be interested in trying to manage.

There is also a trade-off that most people don't consider:
When you buy a console, you are also getting a reasonable expectation that any games you buy for it will run on it, and also that they aren't going to do anything sketchy, I think that is half of the entire reason for why consoles became so popular in the first place.
Now I'm going to be the last one to claim that modders go to the dark side, historically they've proven themselves largely to act responsibly, but there have been some bad apples.
The problem here is that opening consoles up to mods, regardless of their historical record, compromises that expectation. Additionally, anyone using mods whether it be on PC or on consoles absolutely should be aware that there is always some degree of risk associated with using them and neither the console manufacturers or the studios are going to let them selves be held responsible for if something bad does happen.

There's more, but this is already getting lengthy as it is.
Again though this isn't to say mods shouldn't become more prevalent on consoles, but these are some of the larger hurdles. Consoles have slowly started to become more friendly to the idea of mods, but they are still far from actually being "mod-friendly".

You aren't forgotten, not by a long shot, but consoles are a whole different ecosystem.

And yet Bethesda did it with ease, with Fall out 4.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, ZenRowe said:

It's a good question. In practice I've never gone far enough down this particular part of the rabbit hole to be able to find out if they have specific rules for such a thing. I know it's possible, but to my knowledge the console manufacturers provide no support for this, and setting up a distribution system like that even on PC isn't a trivial thing to do. I imagine consoles will also have extra rules regarding security and transfer methods as well.

Yeah, PC has Steam and I'm guessing WildCard considers Steam to be vetted enough that you all use it as mod-distribution.  Nice and easy for us, and I'm sure it makes it a bit easier for WildCard too, having Steam handle that!  But setting up 3 others for PS4, Xbox, and Switch, I just wonder what it would take and if they would even be interested.  These other companies with console mods are fairly big players with a bit more history and "pull," if you will, so I wonder if they would be stricter (with regulating and certifying mods than they would be with the other companies) with WildCard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, CyberAngel67 said:

And yet Bethesda did it with ease, with Fall out 4.

When only 3 companies have done it across the entire history of home game consoles, that's a pretty glaring indicator that it is in fact not "with ease".
If you are about to reference something said by Todd Howard about it, you should know better by now. 🙂
Bethesda generally has the resources to brute force their way through just about any roadblock that they want without having to worry much about the consequences if it flops (and  they have made many catastrophic missteps when it comes to their modding community).

 

1 hour ago, TheDonn said:

Yeah, PC has Steam and I'm guessing WildCard considers Steam to be vetted enough that you all use it as mod-distribution.  Nice and easy for us, and I'm sure it makes it a bit easier for WildCard too, having Steam handle that!  But setting up 3 others for PS4, Xbox, and Switch, I just wonder what it would take and if they would even be interested.  These other companies with console mods are fairly big players with a bit more history and "pull," if you will, so I wonder if they would be stricter (with regulating and certifying mods than they would be with the other companies) with WildCard.

Not only that but on PC modding communities have historically been able to handle their own distribution systems for mods (Nexus, ModDB, and even just direct sharing through forums as it was for Minecraft in the beginning) Largely I actually prefer it that was as a modder, because it means that mods can continue to thrive even after a studio may have stopped active support for a game. That is unfortunately something that will never be true for consoles, if a game stops getting active support from a studio, then there is probably not going to be anyone there to curate new mods and updates for old ones.

Now I can't speak to what situation other companies may or may not have. Bethesda as an example confuses me, I can't tell if they skirt the rules or just outright ignore them.
The Farming Simulator console mod situation is more in line with what I would expect to see from most studios, they only permit content mods (No custom code) on consoles. They have set up their own distribution system and they aren't a behemoth of a studio, so I think that speaks to it certainly being possible, but I also don't know how large of an investment that system was for them. I know in the cases of all 3 companies that have ever put mods on console though that the mods had to manually curated by human beings. Every release, and every update.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, ZenRowe said:

When only 3 companies have done it across the entire history of home game consoles, that's a pretty glaring indicator that it is in fact not "with ease".
If you are about to reference something said by Todd Howard about it, you should know better by now. 🙂
Bethesda generally has the resource to brute force their way through just about any roadblock that they want without having to worry much about the consequences if it flops (and  they have made many catastrophic missteps when it comes to their modding community).

And considering how popular Ark became on the Xbox, I am sure Wildcard could have done the same thing. They just not to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, CyberAngel67 said:

And considering how popular Ark became on the Xbox, I am sure Wildcard could have done the same thing. They just not to.

I think you missed the point of the information.
But sure, if you want to be reductive, yeah we choose not to put mods on console that way... currently. Who knows what the future may hold.
For now we do it via purchasing the mods directly from the authors, polishing them up a little further and making them official content.

But we definitely don't have the kind of resources or the staff size Bethesda can afford to throw around. Comparing us to Bethesda is flattering (I guess?) but unrealistic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, ZenRowe said:

I think you missed the point of the information.
But sure, if you want to be reductive, yeah we choose not to put mods on console that way... currently. Who knows what the future may hold.
For now we do it via purchasing the mods directly from the authors, polishing them up a little further and making them official content.

But we definitely don't have the kind of resources or the staff size Bethesda can afford to throw around. Comparing us to Bethesda is flattering (I guess?) but unrealistic.

Maybe, maybe not.

The point was that Bethesda did it, the team size is probably a drop in the ocean to the staff the company has. But they did it.

And while the future can bring anything, it would have been more productive to do the same thing as far as Wildcard is concerned, because then the resources need to do get a mod converted to work would be non existent to what you have.

But hey, logic has never been Wildcards strong point....

I mean who in the right mind advertises a game to have Full Controller support and actually on have Partial Controller support when it comes to the Steam version..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ZenRowe said:

Now I can't speak to what situation other companies may or may not have. Bethesda as an example confuses me, I can't tell if they skirt the rules or just outright ignore them.
The Farming Simulator console mod situation is more in line with what I would expect to see from most studios, they only permit content mods (No custom code) on consoles. They have set up their own distribution system and they aren't a behemoth of a studio, so I think that speaks to it certainly being possible, but I also don't know how large of an investment that system was for them. I know in the cases of all 3 companies that have ever put mods on console though that the mods had to manually curated by human beings. Every release, and every update.

I didn't know console-mods has been done as little as 3 times...  Not to be a nay-sayer but it makes it seem like that tips the odds pretty far out of favor of this ever actually happening!  Though I have a Switch and got ARK for it for only 30 bucks, and even on the Switch it is a hoot.  Mods would of course increase the fun, but c'est la vie for the consoles I guess!

So, you're saying there can't be a system in place to write code and automate any part of the console-mods, or push updates?  But also the threefold investment WildCard would have to make to set up distribution with all three, means even more investment and personnel to conceive, write, test, validate/certify, and push updates.  That is nuts.  OH WELL, GET TO HIRING!!

I kid, I kid.  As primarily a PC player, I look forward to what Genesis brings and more ARK story, and more dinos.  I hope you all keep up the good work you are doing, and that we hear some news about progress on the QoL list Ced has been spearheading.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

2 hours ago, CyberAngel67 said:

Maybe, maybe not.

The point was that Bethesda did it, the team size is probably a drop in the ocean to the staff the company has. But they did it.

And while the future can bring anything, it would have been more productive to do the same thing as far as Wildcard is concerned, because then the resources need to do get a mod converted to work would be non existent to what you have.

But hey, logic has never been Wildcards strong point....

Since you like comparison, let met do my own.

I've been modding for the Source Engine for over a decade. I've been Project Leader of a scripting platform for that engine since 2012. The amount of support and money Wildcard is throwing into their modding scene is simply amazing in comparison. VALVe do not care about their modding community. They do not provide updated tools and SDK; the community does through reverse engineering. They will also make sure to make it the more difficult they can by randomly removing public symbols from their binaries letting the community struggle to keep their mods updated resorting to sig-scanning. They will push updates breaking 25,000+ community servers and won't care the slightest (I look at you protobuf update). They will also ban servers that make use of their paid content. For example, if you change the skin of weapons, etc. for models that are available into their paid loot crates, they will ban your token from the master server and prevent you from ever launching or hosting any servers.

On the other hand, Wildcard do not only provide up-to-date tools (the DevKit), but they also sponsor modders and their mods. They allow modders to use any DLC-specific content into their mods without restrictions. Without mentioning their modding contests and prize pool. As a business standpoint, this is not a good investment and yet they still invest into it. The only benefit they get out of their investment is that this give them the opportunity to pick content and implement it into the base game (and yet, they will still pay for that content). Without mentioning the countless people they hired straight from the modding community, so I guess this is a good "recruitment campaign". But I personally don't think any players ever bought the game because they liked a specific mod so that would not be accurate to say mods boost their sales although perhaps having a customizable game can be appealing to some. Now you are comparing Wildcard to Bethesda, but as far as I know their "Creation Club" requires players to purchase credits in order to "buy" modded content. They are probably also giving a generous slice of the profit they generates to Sony and Microsoft allowing them to bend their strict rules. And since they treat their modding scene as a business, this gives them more resource to invest, etc. If Wildcard were to implement the same model as Bethesda, you would be the first to complain about the mods not being free.

Now, don't get me wrong. I understand that the fact mods are not available on consoles can be disappointing. But saying they do not care about the modding scene is a bit unfair considering all the effort they put into it. And I'm sure if Sony and Microsoft were offering builtin support for mods like Steam does, they would already been implemented and available on consoles.

2 hours ago, CyberAngel67 said:

I mean who in the right mind advertises a game to have Full Controller support and actually on have Partial Controller support when it comes to the Steam version..

Please refrain from hijacking this thread. You already have an active one about the controller issues so keep it there. 😑

Edited by invincibleqc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, invincibleqc said:

 

Since you like comparison, let met do my own.

I've been modding for the Source Engine for over a decade. I've been Project Leader of a scripting platform for that engine since 2012. The amount of support and money Wildcard is throwing into their modding scene is simply amazing in comparison. VALVe do not care about their modding community. They do not provide updated tools and SDK; the community does through reverse engineering. They will also make sure to make it the more difficult they can by randomly removing public symbols from their binaries letting the community struggle to keep their mods updated resorting to sig-scanning. They will push updates breaking 25,000+ community servers and won't care the slightest (I look at you protobuf update). They will also ban servers that make use of their paid content. For example, if you change the skin of weapons, etc. for models that are available into their paid loot crates, they will ban your token from the master server and prevent you from ever launching or hosting any servers.

On the other hand, Wildcard do not only provide up-to-date tools (the DevKit), but they also sponsor modders and their mods. They allow modders to use any DLC-specific content into their mods without restrictions. Without mentioning their modding contests and prize pool. As a business standpoint, this is not a good investment and yet they still invest into it. The only benefit they get out of their investment is that this give them the opportunity to pick content and implement it into the base game (and yet, they will still pay for that content). Without mentioning the countless people they hired straight from the modding community, so I guess this is a good "recruitment campaign". But I personally don't think any players ever bought the game because they liked a specific mod so that would not be accurate to say mods boost their sales although perhaps having a customizable game can be appealing to some. Now you are comparing Wildcard to Bethesda, but as far as I know their "Creation Club" requires players to purchase credits in order to "buy" modded content. They are probably also giving a generous slice of the profit they generates to Sony and Microsoft allowing them to bend their strict rules. And since they treat their modding scene as a business, this gives them more resource to invest, etc. If Wildcard were to implement the same model as Bethesda, you would be the first to complain about the mods not being free.

Now, don't get me wrong. I understand that the fact mods are not available on consoles can be disappointing. But saying they do not care about the modding scene is a bit unfair considering all the effort they put into it. And I'm sure if Sony and Microsoft were offering builtin support for mods like Steam does, they would already been implemented and available on consoles.

And could you imagine if they put that money to making an ecosystem for mods to all platforms!!

 

9 minutes ago, invincibleqc said:

Please refrain from hijacking this thread. You already have an active one about the controller issues so keep it there. 😑

Wasn't hijacking it, it was a point about Wildcard's non existent logic!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...